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ALBUM

Enter Portraits, A Definitive Album From Chris Orrick.

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Chris Orrick isn’t afraid to tell you everything he hates, yet the opening verse of Portraits paints an artist who seems to be questioning his position in this world of creators he enters. Not for this era he laments before going on his hate rant & I’d venture to go to bat with that argument in an industry consumed by simple melodies plus a lack of lyrical depth. I would also dare to say I don’t buy that – this year has been a treat for hip hop listeners & Portraits provides a competitive slice of lyricist pie. In fact as I listened to Chris Orrick’s advice & let the music play on I knew this ex-factory worker from Michigan whose been at the lyrical helm for the last half-decade was delivering a definitive album. Formally RED PILL, Chris ditches his old entity & delivers an honest, real life rap, & social commentary infused lyrical portrait of who he is as an artist. Piano pattered productions from a powerful team of producers including Nolan the Ninja, L’Orange, Exile, Apollo Brown, and Onra blend effortlessly into each other & demonstrate the perfect backdrop for Portraits. The element of consistency record to record is one of my largest compliments for PortraitsChris Orrick has seemingly mastered the art of having a sound that defines him. He successfully delivers an album that plays like one enormously long song even on shuffle yet in a rare way each song still carries it weight solo. The first three entree’s of Portraits provide a powerful opening punch & as you move forward it just builds & builds. Fashawn & Verbal Kent arrive as the only two guest appearances both to shine with fantastic verses. All in all Portraits is well worth the listen, & damn near one of the best projects I’ve heard this year.( Surely in my top ten.) If I were to pick three standouts “Design Flaw“, “Bottom Feeders feat. Fashawn“, & “Mom” would top my list with extra props to Nolan The Ninja on “Mom” for having supplied easily one of my favorite instrumentals of the year. Preview “Portraits” below and remember if your down with the sounds to share, stream, or buy the album today to help show your support for one of Mello Music Group’s finest artists & latest offerings. – COMMi$$ION
TRACKLISTING:
  1. Self-Portrait (prod. Nolan The Ninja)
  2. Stories (prod. Bruce Wain)
  3. Design Flaw (prod. L’Orange)
  4. The Rubric (feat. Verbal Kent / prod. Calvin Valentine)
  5. Lazy Buddies (prod. Apollo Brown)
  6. Escape Plan (prod. Samarei)
  7. Anywhere Instead (prod. L’Orange)
  8. Bottom Feeders (feat. Fashawn / prod. Exile)
  9. Barfly (prod. Onra)
  10. Jealous of the Sun (prod. Onra)
  11. Mom (prod. Nolan The Ninja)
  12. What Happens Next (prod. Nolan The Ninja)

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ALBUM

Da Ruckus New Album “Da Unreleased Episode”

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Emcee producer HUSH and UNCLE ILL has blessed us all with a blast from the past. Da Unreleased Episode is the last album Da Ruckus was working on before they started working on solo projects. This was the follow up work to Episode 1. They pressed 50 CDs and 50 Cassettes for fans and that was the only light of day the project seen. D.U.E. never got an official release and twenty plus years later hear we are. This album has gems!
The first track “Life Is A Gamble serves as a reminder and pays homage to the prior release Episode 1. Track two called “Eye Confess” features pre record deal D12 member Eiy-Kyu. These three emcees confess some issues from within to a beat that’s perfect for doing so. What ever happened to Eiy-Kyu?
Da Ruckus features their short lived Generation Techs crew on songs “We Are” and “Check It” featuring Da Brigade who are D12 members Kon Artis and Kuniva. GT lasted about as long as both songs combined but left us some solid recordings.
Over all this is a well rounded album.
The production and rhymes are more of what you loved about Episode 1. Out of five mics this a strong four. This album is a must hear for hip hop heads and available on every music streaming platform.
More info can be found at DaRuckus.com

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ALBUM

How to Dress Well in the Dark // mBtheLight New Music

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Photo by James Adams
Mahogani Music is excited to announce the release of How to Dress Well in the Dark (H2DWITD), a new body of work by Detroit-based multidisciplinary artist Monica Blaire under the moniker mBtheLight (mB). With featured tracks by Nick Speed and Andrés, H2DWITD marks mB’s premier as a producer and displays a fusion of jazz, R&B and electronica, creating a sonic landscape all her own.
The product of a triumphant performance artist, composer and singer-songwriter, mB’s debut on Mahogani Music is a shift in artistic direction, a twelve-track collection of songs that epigraph transformation and creative self-awareness. Developed over the course of three years, H2DWITD details a process of liberation from a space of emotional affliction–marked by recurring obstacles and cyclical dissatisfaction–into a period of renewal and expanded understanding of self.

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ALBUM

Dubterraneous One Be Lo-Fi and instrumentals

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One Be Lo “After digging through my ‘90’s tape collection, I found old loops, samples & unreleased beats that I haven’t heard since cd’s became the popular format. The first batch of records (Inherited from my Stepfather…Ok maybe I borrowed them…Maybe I just took the records and never gave them back, but he didn’t have a record player any more so they begged me to spin time with them.) I ever chopped, are on these tapes. In the beginning when I first started making beats, I didn’t own any equipment besides a tape deck. I recorded samples from vinyl onto cassette so I could dissect them in my Walkman or in the car on the way to the studio with Decompoze. We booked sessions with D.L. Jones, and chopped the records in his basement. He had the ultimate set up which included the Akai S950 rack model and the infamous SP1200. We brought the records over, told D. L. where to chop, add drums, sequence, then put on tape so we could go home and write rhymes. Usually the sessions were 4-5 hours and we always left with 2 beats each. That period lasted around 2 years, then we eventually started making beats on the MPC 2000 XL.”

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